Channel Stroop








Channel Stroop (RGB), 10x10 inches (Triptych) 2018

A play on language and visual perception. (Words about color without color)

Displayed as:

Red Channel (Blue Matte)
Green Channel (Red Matte)
Blue Channel (Green Matte)



GREEN AS WELL AS BLUE AS WELL AS RED
RED AND GREEN AND BLUE MORE OR LESS
RED OVER AND ABOVE GREEN OVER AND ABOVE BLUE
RED IN RELATION TO GREEN IN RELATION TO BLUE
RED IN LIEU OF GREEN IN LIEU OF BLUE

In psychology, the Stroop effect is a demonstration of interference in the reaction time of a task.

When the name of a color (e.g., "blue", "green", or "red") is printed in a color which is not denoted by the name (i.e., the word "red" printed in blue ink instead of red ink), naming the color of the word takes longer and is more prone to errors than when the color of the ink matches the name of the color.

The effect is named after John Ridley Stroop, who first published the effect in English in 1935.[1] The effect had previously been published in Germany in 1929 by other authors.[2][3][4] The original paper has been one of the most cited papers in the history of experimental psychology, leading to more than 700 replications.[4] The effect has been used to create a psychological test (Stroop test) that is widely used in clinical practice and investigation.  [More]

#universals #classificationofcolor #minimalism #2018

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